Erie Marsh Coastal Restoration Project Factsheet


Project Summary

The Erie Marsh Coastal Restoration Project will ultimately restore 946 acres of freshwater coastal wetland in Erie Marsh Preserve, which will:

  • Allow the exchange of water, energy, and animals between targeted wetlands and Lake Erie
  • Provide access to key spawning areas for ecologically and economically important fish species
  • Improve function and quality of wetlands for migratory birds
  • Increase capacity for wetland management and access for recreation

Implementation of a four-phase restoration design will allow management of a mosaic of wetland types, while at the same time providing effective control of invasive species.

  • Phase I: Install a new bi-directional pump station, fish passage structure and water distribution canal to reconnect the 946 wetland acres located within the perimeter levee to Lake Erie and connect the pump station to the ten independently managed wetland units.
  • Phase II: Construct levees to restore and enhance five independently managed wetland units.
  • Phase III: Construct levees, extend the water distribution canal, and install water control structure to restore and enhance two independently managed wetland units.
  • Phase IV: Construct levees, extend the water distribution canal, and install water control structures to restore and enhance two independently managed wetland units.

Monitoring and Management during Phases I-IV will include management of invasive species using chemical treatments and prescribed fire and monitoring changes to plants, wildlife, and fish to demonstrate project success.

Learn more about the restoration work being done at Erie Marsh by watching the video below.


The Nature Conservancy is working on the Erie Marsh Coastal Restoration Project in collaboration with these key partners: Erie Shooting and Fishing Club, Ducks Unlimited, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Detroit River International Wildlife Refuge, Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, NOAA, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.
 

Contact: Chris May | 517.316.2274

 

Back to Western Lake Erie Conservation Strategy